F-15E Crash Claims Life of Crew Member

Capt. Francis D. Imlay, 31, of Vacaville, Calif., died Wednesday when his F-15E crashed approximately 15 miles outside of a base in Southwest Asia, announced the Pentagon. Imlay's fellow crew member was injured in the mishap, stated Air Forces Central officials in a release. Emergency response personnel brought the injured crew member to a military medical facility for treatment of minor injuries, they said. Imlay was assigned to the 391st Fighter Squadron at Mountain Home AFB, Idaho. "This is obviously a very sad day for the Gunfighters, as we mourn the loss of one of our warriors," said Col. Ron Buckley, commander of Mountain Home's 366th Fighter Wing, the squadron's parent unit, in a release. Buckley added, "Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends during this time." The cause of the incident is under investigation. More details will be released as they become available, said the AFCENT officials. (See our initial coverage from Thursday.)

No Root Cause In Hand

Despite an extensive investigation, the Air Force has yet to pinpoint the cause of a series of “physiological incidents” with F-22 pilots that led to the grounding of the Raptor fleet last year, stated service officials Thursday. “We do not...

Raptor Fleet Taking a “911 Approach”

Air Combat Command continues taking measures to closely track conditions in the F-22 cockpit to ensure the safety of Raptor pilots, some of whom have experienced hypoxia-like symptoms—as if they have insufficient oxygen in flight—in certain environments. Maj. Gen. Charles...

Cyber Secure

A newly completed Air Force Global Strike Command study exploring potential cyber vulnerabilities of the Minuteman III ICBM has found that the missile system is well insulated, Lt. Gen. James Kowalski, command boss, told lawmakers this week. “The conclusion of...

Common Interests

The Obama Administration is studying a common nuclear warhead design that could replace the W78 that sits atop Minuteman III ICBMs and the W88 carried by Trident II submarine-launched ballistic missiles, Pentagon officials told lawmakers this week. “A common warhead...

McCain Demands R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Miffed that the Office of Secretary of Defense isn’t complying with provisions in this year’s defense authorization act, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said Thursday he’ll block the civilian nominations before the Senate Armed Services Committee to fill senior-level Pentagon positions....

Not in the Cards

While US Forces Korea is undergoing a multiyear force restructuring on the Korean Peninsula, there will be no expansion of tour normalization beyond the current authorization for up to 4,645 command-sponsored military families to reside there, said Army Gen. James Thurman, USFK commander. More families would bring additional requirements and costs and are "unaffordable" under the current fiscal environment, he told the House Armed Services Committee on Wednesday. "I do not think . . . that is feasible," he said. Thurman said the most recent defense authorization act set the level of sponsored families at 4,645. Today, there are some 3,800 families that are command sponsored. "We have not achieved the 4,645 as of yet," he said. Thurman said "the biggest issue" he faces is "the constant turnover of personnel, primarily Army." With the one-year assignments on the peninsula, there are about 600 to 700 personnel rotating out each month, mostly lower enlisted grade soldiers, he explained. Despite the cap on sponsored families and frequent turnover, "we have a well-stated mission and I have not seen a decline in any morale issues," he said. (Thurman's prepared statement)